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Author Photo by: Pusokong Rating: 0
May 10 2019, 5:22pm CST ~ 1 week, 5 days ago. 
Hello, sa inyong lahat.
Kailangan ko ng tulong sa maka at ma verbs.
Are maka verbs actor focused or object focused?
Are ma verbs actor focused or object focused?
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Author Photo FilipinoChatAdmin Rating: 0
May 10 2019, 6:44pm CST ~ 1 week, 5 days ago. 
Maka- verbs (used to indicate ability to do something, or accidentally/unintentionally doing somethin) are generally Actor focused.
Ex:
Hindi ako nakapunta. = I was not able to go. = Actor focused.
Nakatulog ang sanggol. = The baby fell asleep. = Actor focused.
 
Ma- verbs can be either Actor or Object focused.
If the ma- verb takes an object it will be object focused. If it is intransitive (does not take an object) then it’s actor focused.
Ex:
Matutulog na ako. = I am going to sleep now. = Actor focused.
Nalaman ko ang katotohanan. = I found out the truth. = Object focused.
 
The Actor focused Ma- verbs are usually about feeling or sensing or a state of being. (Ex: magutom=to feel hungry, malungkot=to feel sad, magalit=to be angry).
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
May 10 2019, 11:23pm CST ~ 1 week, 5 days ago. 
@Pusokong
 
The reply of FilipinoChatAdmin is correct. The "ma-" prefix may appear in either actor- or object-focused verbs.
 
Although "maka-" generally appears in actor-focused verbs, it may also appear to be with an object-focused verb if the verb is about a shared action between the subject and the object. In such cases, it would just depend on who is considered the actor and the object of the sentence.
 
For example:
Nakatrabaho ni Peter si Paul. = Si Paul ay nakatrabaho ni Peter. = Peter had a chance to work with Paul.
Nakatrabaho si Peter ni Paul. = Si Peter ay nakatrabaho ni Paul. = Paul had a chance to work with Peter.
 
In the Filipino sentences, the "ni" determines the actor and the "si" determines the subject/object, which indicates that the verb is object-focused.
 
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Author Photo Pusokong Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 1:18am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@FilipinoChatAdmin
Maraming salamat po para sa iyong sagot.
Ang tanong ito ay driving me mabaliw .
 
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Author Photo Pusokong Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 1:20am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@FilipinoChatAdmin Maraming salamat Po.
That's exactly what I needed you know.
 
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Author Photo Pusokong Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 1:47am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
Makagawa ako nito.
I was able to do it.
I can do it.
Nagawa ko ito.
I was able to do it.
I can do it.
'di ba?
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 5:59am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@Pusokong
 
Makagawa ako nito... = I, to be able to make/do this...
Kailangan ang isang oras para makagawa ako nito. = An hour is needed so that I can/would be able to make/do this.
 
Nakagawa ako nito. = I was able to make/do this. or I was able to do/make something like this.
Nakagawa ako nito sa loob ng isang oras. = I was able to do/make this in an hour.
Nakagawa ako nito noong isang taon. = I was able to do/make something like this last year.
 
Nagawa ko ito. = I was able to do it/this. or I did it/this.
Magagawa ko ito. = I can do it/this.
 
Depending on the context, "nakagawa ako nito" and "nagawa ko ito" could mean the same thing. "Makagawa" is more often used with creating things, i.e., "to make", while "magawa" is usually just "to do".
 
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Author Photo banyaga02 Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 6:54am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
Why "nakagawa ako nito" and "makagagawa ako nito/makakagawa ako nito" are grammatically correct but "makagawa ako nito" is ungrammatical in Tagalog?
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 7:13am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@banyaga02
 
Because "makagawa" is the infinitive.
 
Makagawa ako nito. = I to be able to make this.
Nakagawa ako nito. = I was able to make this.
Nakakagawa/Nakagagawa ako nito. = I am able to make this.
Makakagawa/Makagagawa ako nito. = I will be able to make this.
 
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Author Photo Pusokong Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 7:52am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@Tagamanila Thanks you so much.That helps me a lot. More than I could possibly tell you in words 🙂
 
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Author Photo banyaga02 Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 8:35am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@Tagamanila
Thanks. My filipina friend told me that too. It's incorrect to say, "makagawa ako nito", it should be preceded by pseudo verbs or conjunctions like upang, para, nang sa ganun, etc because makagawa is in infinitive form, but if you turn it into interrogative sentence by adding kaya, it becomes grammatical eventhough it is in infinitive form?
 
1. Upang/para/nang sa ganun makagawa ako nito (correct)
 
2. Makagawa ako nito (incorrect)
 
But you can say,
 
3. Makagawa kaya ako nito? (correct)
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 9:26am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@banyaga02
 
That's right. As an infinitive it does not function as a verb in a phrase. You will need to add a verb or a clause that includes a verb to give meaning to the phrase.
 
Upang/para/nang sa ganun makagawa ako nito = So that I will be able to do/make this - This is a dependent clause that will need an independent clause to make sense. For example, we can add the independent clause "... kailangan ko ng gamit" (I need tools).
 
Makagawa kaya ako nito? = Would I be able to make something like this? - "Would" becomes the verb.
 
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Author Photo Pusokong Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 11:37am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@Tagamanila Hi Tagamanila. Is that only because of that particular word ?
 
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Author Photo banyaga02 Rating: 0
May 11 2019, 8:11pm CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
@Tagamanila
This topic is very confusing. Does it mean that the lexical category of a word inTagalog changes based on its context in a sentence or just by adding a word before a particular word like "makagawa"?
 
1. Makagawa ako nito (incorrect)
 
2. Baka makagawa ako nito (correct)- adding adverb, baka.
BakaNG makagawa ako nito (incorrect)
Baka NA makagawa ako nito (incorrect)
 
4. Pwede makagawa ako nito (incorrect) - adding adverb, pwede
 
5. PwedeNG makagawa ako nito (correct)
Pwede NA makagawa ako nito (correct) - just by adding linker "ng/na" it becomes grammatical? Why is linker very important here to make the sentence grammatical? But in no. 4, "baka" is not linked by "na/ng" and if you add ng/na after baka it becomes incorrect?
 
6. Maaari...makagawa ako nito (correct) - adverb, maaari
Maaaring makagawa ako nito (correct)
Maaari na makagawa ako nito (correct)
- with or without linker both sentences are correct.
 
7. Sana makagawa ako nito (correct)
Makagawa sana ako nito (correct)
Makagawa ako nito...sana (correct)
 
This is the most confusing part for me. "Makagawa" is not only preceded by adverb "sana" it could also be placed after "makagawa" or even at the end of the sentence.
 
*******
 
I've observed that Tagalog has flexible rules when it comes to lexical category of a word.
 
"Ganda" in most Tagalog grammar books is categorized as adjective and nouns but never as a verb and adverb. Same thing with "ano" and "sino." They are alaways categorized as "question markers" but when I read some Tagalog books they also function as verbs.
 
Example:
 
1. Kulang man ang mga ito sa GANDA, nakikita naman ang tibay at tatag ng mga ito. - noun
 
2. Ang GANDA n'ya - simple adjective
 
3. GANDAhan mo naman ito - verb
 
4. MaGANDA siya - affixed adjective
 
5. MaGANDA siya manamit - adverb
 
* ma adjective can also functions as an adverb.
 
* ANO
 
Ano ito? - question marker
 
Aanuhin mo ito? - verb
 
Bakit ka nangaANO di naman kita inaANO - verb
 
MaANO naman ngayon - not sure if this adjective or verb
 
* SINO
 
Sino ito? - question marker
 
Wala akong siniSINO - verb?
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
May 12 2019, 5:46am CST ~ 1 week, 3 days ago. 
Is that only because of that particular word ?
 
@Pusokong
 
I'm not sure what you're referring to, but if it's about the infinitive needing a verb, then it's true with any verb whose infinitive is not the same as its past tense form and/or imperative form. That's the case with "maka-" and another prefix I can think of now is "makapag-".
 
For example:
Infinitive: makabasa (to be able to read)
Imperative: none
Past: nakabasa
- no match.
 
Infinitive: magbasa (to read)
Imperative: magbasa
Past: nagbasa
- infinitive = imperative
 
Infinitive: bumasa (to read)
Imperative: bumasa
Past: bumasa
- infinitive = imperative = past
 
The need for a verb applies to the infinitive "makabasa" because it is not repeated in either the imperative or past tense form.
 
Makabasa ako nito = I to be able to read this. - incorrect
Makabasa kaya ako nito? = Would I be able to read this? - correct
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
May 12 2019, 7:28am CST ~ 1 week, 3 days ago. 
@banyaga02
 
> 2. Baka makagawa ako nito (correct)- adding adverb, baka.
> BakaNG makagawa ako nito (incorrect)
> Baka NA makagawa ako nito (incorrect)
 
“Baka” is “maybe/might be”.
 
Baka (might be) makagawa (to be able to make) ako (I) nito (this). = I might be able to make this.
 
Baka NA = BakaNG = Maybe, that is
 
Bakang (might be, that is) makagawa (to be able to make) ako (I) nito (this). = I might be, that is, to be able to make this. - Does not sound right.
 
> 5. PwedeNG makagawa ako nito (correct)
> Pwede NA makagawa ako nito (correct) - just by adding linker "ng/na" it becomes grammatical? Why is
> linker very important here to make the sentence grammatical? But in no. 4, "baka" is not linked by
> "na/ng" and if you add ng/na after baka it becomes incorrect?
 
Pwede NA = PwedeNG.
 
“Pwede” is “can/possible”. “Pwedeng makagawa” = “pwede na makagawa” = “possible, that is, to be able to make”. “Pwede” functions as a modifier of “makagawa” (possible to make), hence the need for the linker “na”.
 
Pwedeng makagawa ako nito = (Lit.) I possible to make this = I can make this. - “Pwede” modified “to be able to make” that’s why it became “can make”.
 
Baka makagawa ako nito = I might be able to make this. - “Might be” does not modify “to be able to make” that’s why it did not change it.
 
> 6. Maaari...makagawa ako nito (correct) - adverb, maaari
> Maaaring makagawa ako nito (correct)
> Maaari na makagawa ako nito (correct)
> - with or without linker both sentences are correct.
 
“Maaari” is also “can/possible”. The same explanation for “pwede” applies here.
 
However, your first sentence “Maaari...makagawa ako nito” is NOT correct.
 
> 7. Sana makagawa ako nito (correct)
> Makagawa sana ako nito (correct)
> Makagawa ako nito...sana (correct)
 
> This is the most confusing part for me. "Makagawa" is not only preceded by adverb "sana" it could also
> be placed after "makagawa" or even at the end of the sentence.
 
“Sana” is “I hope/hopefully”. However, since “makagawa ako nito” needs a verb, “sana” becomes “I hope” here and it is the independent clause . It makes the sentence complete.
 
Sana makagawa ako nito. = (Lit.) I hope I to be able to make this/something like this. = I hope I can make this/something like this.
 
Even if “sana” is placed after “makagawa” or at the end of the sentence, the meaning of the sentence will not change.
 
I hope I can make this/something like this.
I can, I hope, make this/something like this.
I can make this/something like this, I hope.
 
> I've observed that Tagalog has flexible rules when it comes to lexical category of a word.
 
> "Ganda" in most Tagalog grammar books is categorized as adjective and nouns but never as a verb and
> adverb. Same thing with "ano" and "sino." They are alaways categorized as "question markers" but
> when I read some Tagalog books they also function as verbs.
 
> Example:
 
1. Kulang man ang mga ito sa GANDA, nakikita naman ang tibay at tatag ng mga ito. = Even if these lack BEAUTY, you can see their durability and sturdiness. - noun
 
2. Ang GANDA n'ya = She is SO/VERY BEAUTIFUL - simple adjective - “Ganda” here is an adjective only because “ang” functions as an intensifier of the adjective “maganda”. “Ang” is “so/very” here.
 
MAGANDA ka. = You are BEAUTIFUL. - adjective
ANG GANDA mo. = You are SO BEAUTIFUL. - adjective (Intensified adjectives take the possessive form of the noun/pronoun.)
Ang GANDA mo ay walang katulad. = Your BEAUTY is incomparable. - noun
 
3. GANDAhan mo naman ito = Do this the best way you can. - verb - Don’t forget that “ganda” is a root word. If you place a “ma-” before it, it becomes the adjective “maganda” (beautiful). If you add the suffix “-han” to it, it becomes the verb “gandahan” (to work on something the best way possible).
 
> 4. MaGANDA siya - affixed adjective
 
5. MaGANDA siya manamit - adverb - This sentence is incorrect. “Maganda” is a modifier of “manamit” (the manner of dressing up), hence it needs the linker “na”. This sentence should be “MaGANDA siya NA manamit” or “MaGANDA siyaNG manamit” (He/She dresses up nicely/beautifully).
 
* ma adjective can also functions as an adverb. - Yes, but “beautiful” becomes “beautifully” as an adverb.
 
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